List of 3 player arcade games with joystick or trackball control

Back in 2014 I started working on my first video game project with programmer Adam Jenkins, and I’m pleased to say that it’s nearly fully-fledged and ready to launch. Our final Beta version is available now on itch.io and our next milestone with be our long-anticipated release on Steam.

My game is called Cuttle Scuttle, and it’s a three player cooperative cuttlefish survival simulator. The mazes are rocky reefs full of predators and prey, and the objective is to lay as many eggs as possible while using camouflage, ink-shots and cunning to stay alive.

Cuttle Scuttle captures the spirit of classic cooperative gaming and the hardships of cuttlefish life
Cuttle Scuttle captures the spirit of classic cooperative gaming and the hardships of cuttlefish life

The game’s visual and cooperative arcade style were inspired by some classic games of the 1980s and 1990s, including Ms Pac-Man, Frogger II and Bubble Bobble. We’ve long entertained the idea of eventually housing the game in a custom arcade cabinet, reflective of this great period in gaming history… and we’re beginning to make that dream a reality.

As an avid student of history,  I started down this path by compiling a list of  past arcade games that were made to accommodate a maximum of three players simultaneously. I ruled out the shooter and driving games to concentrate on joystick or trackball-controlled games exclusively. This left me with a list comprised mostly of fighting games, and a few oddities like The Three Stooges, Pig Out and SegaSonic the Hedgehog.

With the help of Wikipedia’s terrific alphabetised list of arcade video games, I was able to compile the following list of (non-shooter) 3-player arcade games released between 1984 and 1997. While the table below strives to being exhaustive and accurate, please let me know if you have any titles to add or corrections to make.

If all goes well, Force of Nature might be able to add Cuttle Scuttle (2018) to this list in the months ahead.

Game Alternative titles Year Publisher
The Three Stooges 1984 Mylstar
Rampage 1986 Bally Midway 
Dark Adventure 1987 Konami
Xenophobe 1987 Bally-Midway 
Gain Ground 1988 Sega
Michael Jackson’s Moonwalker 1990 Sega
Pig Out: Dine Like a Swine 1990 Leland
Pit-Fighter 1990 Atari Games
Rampart 1990 Atari Games
The Combatribes 1990 Techn?s Japan
Knights of the Round 1991 Capcom
B. Rap Boys 1992 Kaneko
Cadillacs & Dinosaurs Cadillacs Kyouryuu Shinseiki JP 1992 Capcom
Guardians of the ‘Hood 1992 Atari Games
Warriors of Fate 1992 Capcom
SegaSonic the Hedgehog 1993 Sega
Violent Storm 1993 Konami
Alien vs. Predator 1994 Capcom
Armored Warriors Powered Gear – Strategic Variant Armor Equipment JP 1994 Capcom
Battletoads Super Battletoads 1994 Rare
Rampage World Tour 1997 Midway

 

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SA Government Cabinet papers released under the Freedom of Information Act 1991 – Overseas Travel

Ministers and senior public servants in South Australia travel during their course of their work, at times making overseas delegations to other countries. These are intended to assist them in shaping public policy, developing and maintaining opportunities for commercial trade and public sector cooperation.

The list below contains a series of South Australian Cabinet documents providing rationales and details about proposed overseas delegations to be made by Ministers of the Government of South Australia during the years 2003 through 2007. Such documents become available 10 years after their creation, and can then be formally requested from the Department of the Premier & Cabinet, here.

The documents were released following requests lodged under the Freedom of Information Act 1991 and are free to download and reproduce. This list is not exhaustive, and will be extended as additional requests are fulfilled.

Click on the destination to view or download the corresponding document in .PDF format.

Date Minister Destination
21/07/03 Trish White UK, France & Sweden
24/05/04 Trish White USA
16/08/04 Trish White Spain & Malaysia
06/09/04 Paul Holloway Malaysia
13/12/04 John Hill UK, France, Germany & Spain
13/12/04 Paul Holloway USA
14/02/05 Paul Holloway USA & Canada
07/04/05 Kevin Foley USA (Northrop Grumman)
07/04/05 Kevin Foley Hong Kong & China
18/04/05 Kevin Foley USA (Northrop Grumman)
26/04/05 Paul Holloway China,
Japan & Hong Kong
02/05/05 Paul Holloway China,
Japan & Hong Kong
02/05/05 Mike Rann USA & UK
14/06/05 Mike Rann USA
04/07/05 Rory McEwen Japan
22/08/05 Paul Holloway India, United Arab Emirates
19/09/05 Mike Rann India
10/10/05 Jane Lomax-Smith Malaysia (Malaysia Airlines)
28/03/06 John Hill New Zealand
28/03/06 Mike Rann USA & Canada
08/05/06 Mike Rann UK & France
19/06/06 Carmel Zollo UK, Sweden & Italy
19/06/06 Patrick Conlon UK
03/07/06 Paul Holloway UK, Canada & USA
03/07/06 Rory McEwen China, Canada & USA
07/08/06 Patrick Conlon USA & UK
28/08/06 Karlene Maywald Japan
25/09/06 Kevin Foley USA (Defence industry)
09/10/06 Mike Rann India
23/10/06 Paul Holloway China
26/10/06 Paul Holloway China
30/10/06 Kevin Foley Japan (Mitsubishi)
13/11/06 Kevin Foley Spain, Bahrain & United Arab Emirates
11/12/06 Patrick Conlon United Arab Emirates (DP World)

UPDATE LOG:

    • 26 September 2017 – List first published.
    • 15 October 2017 – Seven new documents added.
    • 28 October 2017 – Two new documents added (Lomax-Smith & Hill).
    • 28 December 2017 – Added Kevin Foley’s 2005 visit to Hong Kong & China.
    • 27 February 2018 – Added three Trish White travel documents.
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Dual citizenship farce sweeps through both houses of the Australian parliament

Last month, I wrote about former Australian Greens Senator Scott Ludlam’s resignation from the Parliament, following the revelation that he held dual citizenship of Australia and New Zealand. Since that time, Section 44 of the Constitution of Australia has received unprecedented attention, as the eligibility of a string of additional Australian Senators and Cabinet ministers has been called into question.

Ludlam’s resignation was closely followed by that of Senator Larissa Waters, who had emigrated to Australia from Canada when she was an infant. She was deemed ineligible owing to her dual citizenship of Australia and Canada.

Both claimed to have been previously unaware of their latent citizenship, having emigrated to Australia as children. They also agreed that Section 44 of the Constitution of Australia was unambiguous with respect to citizenship and promptly resigned.

Typically, citizenship is bestowed in two ways. “Jus solis” or the “right of soil” refers to citizenship associated with a person’s place of birth. “Jus sanguinis” or “right of blood” instead bestows citizenship through one’s parentage.

Unlike Ludlam and Waters, the other parliamentarians who have had their eligibility questioned owing to dual citizenship have chosen to dig in. They now await decisions from the High Court of Australia, acting as the Court of Disputed Returns.

A queue forms at the Court of Disputed Returns

  1. National party MP Matt Canavan currently holds Italian citizenship, which he claims was arranged by his mother in 2006 without his knowledge. He resigned from his Cabinet position as Minister for Resources and Northern Australia, but has not resigned from the Parliament.
  2. One Nation Senator Malcolm Roberts gave conflicting accounts of his citizenship, before eventually admitting that he had been both an Australian and British citizen. Roberts was born in India to an Australian father and British mother. He has not resigned from the Parliament.
  3. Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce was confirmed to be a New Zealand citizen by descent through his father’s side. Joyce claimed ignorance of this. He is continuing in his roles as Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources until the court has ruled on his case.
  4. National party deputy Fiona Nash was confirmed to be a British citizen by descent through her father, who was born in Scotland. Her parents divorced when she was eight, and she was raised by her Australian born mother. She will continue to serve in Cabinet as the Minister for Regional Development and Minister for Local Government and Territories.

What about the Liberal and Labor parties?

Following the Ludlam resignation, I contacted all Australian parliamentarians born outside of Australia, asking about their citizenship statuses. Those with possible citizenship by parentage were harder to trace, so were not contacted. Some members of both major parties were forthcoming, while others were not, and my list was updated as responses were received.

The Acting National Secretary of the ALP, Paul Erickson, provided me with the following blanket statement:

“The Labor Party works closely with all our candidates to ensure that their nomination is sound and compliant with the constitution. This is a critical part of our nomination processes. We are confident that every member of the Labor caucus has been properly elected.”

No similar statement was received from the Liberal party. Replies containing details of citizenships renounced were received from the offices of MPs Sussan Ley and Ian Goodenough only.

And what of Nick Xenophon?

On 14 July 2017 I wrote to the office of Senator Nick Xenophon, in the hopes that he might champion a whole-of-parliament citizenship audit. I wrote:

“I believe it would be pertinent for a fellow Senator such as yourself to suggest that an audit of citizenship status be conducted as soon as practicable for all members of the Commonwealth Parliament… It would be good to give this issue a good air and treat all parliamentarians fairly, given that one senator has taken a principled stand and resigned over the matter.”

Over  a month later, Xenophon has finally called for such an audit- but he wasn’t the first. That title belongs to Australian Greens leader Richard Di Natale. Regrettably for Nick, his own eligibility has also been called into question. Xenophon has told the ABC that he has contacted the UK Home Office, seeking to clarify whether or not he is a British citizen by descent through his father.

So what happens next?

So two senators have resigned and four (potentially five) cases are currently awaiting hearings at the Court of Disputed Returns. The Turnbull government has expressed its view that the court is likely to rule in favour of deeming the three National party members who claim to have recently discovered their dual citizenship statuses eligible to remain. The matter has been very disruptive for the parliament and many political parties and no doubt personally distressing for those directly embroiled.

Should MPs be disqualified pending the court’s decision, the resulting by-elections could shift the balance of power with implications for the government as it is currently formed.

In a piece written on July 27, commentator John Quiggin suggested that some good could yet come from this farcical scene, but only if the Constitution is upheld in full and without bias. I’m inclined to agree with him. He wrote:

“While the framers (of the Constitution) guarded against the sources of corruption evident to them, they never anticipated the problems we have now. It’s OK for political parties to be in hock to foreign donors, for someone who has renounced his Australian citizenship to control most of our media, and for careerist politicians to start out as hack staffers, give out favors in office, and cash them out afterwards. But if you don’t do the paperwork to cancel potential citizenship in a country you’ve never seen, you’re out on your ear.

At this point, the situation is so bad that “worse is better”. The best outcome would be for another dozen or two members of Parliament, from all parties, to be thrown out. Then we might get the unanimous support we would need to fix the absurdities of Section 44. Of course, that wouldn’t do anything about the real problems, but at least we would be free of this anti-democratic nonsense.”

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