Art: ‘Heartsong’ performance combines music, animation, video mixing, sculpture and text

Several months back, Emma Sterling and I were invited by Sophie Hyde of Closer Productions in Adelaide to join a project out of Flinders Medical Centre’s Arts in Health program. The project entitled Heartsong was inspired by the experiences and thoughts of patients and their carers on the Cardiac Care Unit. Fittingly, the resulting multimedia performance was to premiere in an adjoining space, and did so last week.

Heartsong poster & performance details
Heartsong poster & performance details

The project’s video design task was almost an open brief when we were first introduced, though other elements of the performance had been roughly hewn. A text had been assembled by the project’s producer, Cheryl Pickering, constructed from patient and staff testimonials. Accomplished musicians Richard Chew (keyboards) and Ian Dixon (flugelhorn) were involved, and successfully plotted an improvised musical course which supported the text with colour and emotion. A large scale sculpture of a human heart (approximately six feet tall) was constructed by Diwani Oak, and then lit by Emma Sterling and myself, using a combination of projected and LED rope lighting. Diwani also produced several screen-printed and hand-crafted hangings which also adorned the space, and provided a canvas for the thematically connected poetry of Ian Gibbins to feature on.

Heartsongs central sculpture by Diwani Oak (as installed at FMC)
Heartsong's central sculpture by Diwani Oak (as installed at FMC)

Emma Sterling’s and my greater commitment though was the production and presentation of video and animated content to harmonize with Heartsong’s other elements. We called upon many of the approaches we used to produce our first documentary film ‘A Shift in Perception‘ back in 2006 and set about crafting stop-motion animations, moving textural sequences, lifting public domain found footage from The Internet Archive, and preparing them all for live delivery.

When audience members enter the Heartsong space, they are first drawn to Diwani’s light sculpture, which sits as the work’s hearth. An animated rendition of it also rotates on video screens, while another projection presents a faithful recording of a medical heart monitor read-out. When the improvised music begins, pre-recorded voices recall the words of patients and nurses alike, and lead the audience through the patient’s journey- from symptoms and hospital admittance through care and recovery. In performance, my task is to react to the text and emotions presented by Richard and Ian with improvised video, which I layer, blend and loop for the duration of the performance using Arkaos GrandVJ and a Korg NanoKontrol MIDI controller. The piece is designed to have a meditative, gentle and nurturing quality about it, and audience responses thus far have suggested we’re striking that chord.

Heartsong is installed and performed at the RiAus
'Heartsong' is installed and performed at the RiAus

The first performances of the work are behind us now, with only one remaining performance of our debut season remaining. On Friday, December 11th at the Royal Institution of Australia from 6-9pm, the installation will be open, with the performance occurring around 7pm. The performance runs for approximately 25 minutes, and will be followed by a panel discussion with the involved artists plus another artist also currently exhibiting at the RiAus, George Poonkin Khut.

Dan Monceaux

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Web 2.0: Share web badges for charity and heal the world

Since Em and I work as freelancers in a young start-up business, it’s often difficult for us financially to ‘do our bit’ and donate to worthy causes. By that I mean organizations and activities that toil to improve the states of the planet and humanity. I did however just stumble upon the website Everywun which makes spreading positive messages and raising money for charitable causes exceptionally easy for anyone with an internet presence.

My first encounter with web 2.0 charitable giving came through the Causes application for Facebook back in 2007, and it’s good to see that the process is evolving. Unlike many alternatives who require viewers to donate directly, simply displaying sponsored ‘badges’ like these drives financial donations from the sponsoring businesses, directly to the causes you care most for.

Signing up is quick, simple and doesn’t ask for any personal information beyond your name and email address, and your account can be linked to your Facebook profile with a simple click of a button. Code is also generated so you can embed the badges, as they appear below. The process is painless and takes well under 5 minutes… time well spent in reducing the disparities in education, health and welfare between developed and developing countries. It’s not all about people either, and badges supporting progressive environmental action and animal welfare are also available, no doubt with more great causes to follow. In short, if you’re a sensitive, altruistic internet user with a web presence (even if it’s just a Facebook profile) spend a few minutes at Everywun and brighten up the planet’s future.

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