Creativity Base

Tag: Rundle Lantern

Art: Adelaide artists get a raw deal when producing Rundle Lantern animations

by on Aug.18, 2010, under Ethics & Sustainability, Our Projects

When the Rundle Lantern was first illuminated back in 2008, my mind boggled at the creative possibility of producing pixel art works for public display on a giant scale. The innovative screen design, a 34 x 21 panel matrix of illuminated metal panels, wraps around the facade of a multi-storey car park at one of Adelaide’s most renown intersections, where it teases and titillates pedestrians with its silent lo-res animations and video each night. Making effective content for such a screen is no mean feat and requires a balance of technical competency, design, timing and conceptual creativity. It is also time consuming (especially for dedicated pixel animators like ourselves). Regardless of these barriers to entry, the initiatives we’ve been involved with to create new artistic content for the Lantern have gone unpaid and largely uncredited. The following is an account of our experiences producing lantern content for display during two major cultural festivals in South Australia.

Photo by Kentaro W, courtesy of flickr.com

During Adelaide Fringe back in 2009, Emma Sterling and I were part of the first group of artists offered the opportunity to create and display works made specifically for the lantern. No money was to grace the artists palms- the initiative instead offered artists a waiver of the ‘load-up fee’ the Adelaide City Council and contractor Fusion had worked into the screen’s initial operating business model. Seizing the opportunity, we each produced a new work, and took careful note of the council & Adelaide Fringe’s production guidelines. In order to protect the screen’s integrity as a ‘cultural canvas’, the artists were not permitted to display logos within their work.

As experienced practising artists familiar with the concept of ‘droit morale’ or the ‘moral rights of the artist’ we asked about accreditation for our unpaid productions. We were informed that there would be no accreditation offered to the artists at the site of any kind, despite the works being programmed to loop for the duration of the Adelaide Fringe Festival (which runs for over three weeks). Instead we were offered a credit buried in the bowels of the Adelaide City Council’s website. Again, there was no signage indicating the existence of this website at the Lantern site, which in our opinion rendered the gesture tokenistic and almost entirely pointless.

In light of this oversight on the initiative’s organisational part, as artists we decided to exercise our ‘droit morale’ and add our names as closing credits to our work. The notion of the Moral Rights of the Artist protects the artists right to claim authorship of the work wherever it is displayed (attribution), and with it the right to preserve the integrity of the finished art work (ie, no unauthorised modifications to the work are permitted). At the launch night to our shock and horror our rights had been flaunted on both accounts. The Lantern’s content committee (whose persons remain unknown to us) had edited our work and removed our credits without our permission. While this issue of ‘droit morale’ may cause councillors eyes to glaze over, our right as artists to sign our own works is fundamental, and has been protected by Australian law under the Copyright Act. You can learn more about Moral Rights for artists in Australia at the website of the Attorney General’s Department.

Learn more about the Moral Rights of artists in Australia

This year, we were offered an opportunity (again without payment) to produce work for the Rundle Lantern. An initiative of the South Australian Living Artists Festival (an event we have been involved with since 2006) the financial model was slightly improved for at least one member of the local artist community. The Helpmann Academy offered a paid commission to one artist recently graduated from a Helpmann Academy school. The commision offered a $2000 fee to produce a new work and lead a workshop of participants in the generation of a wave of (again unpaid) new content from other local artists.

Once again the artists’ ‘droit moral’ has been flaunted by the lantern’s custodians with credits again barred from the exhibited works. To date there is no evidence of physical signage accrediting the artists as producers of the work, despite this being promised weeks in advance. It is now the 16th of August, and the works have been showing without credit to the artists since July 31st. From the public perspective, passers by will have no idea that light displays on the lantern have been created by local artists at all, and stand no chance of being able to identify any of the creative residents responsible. SALA festival concludes on August 22nd.

Despite ours and others’ ongoing grievances with the Lantern and the business model which cuts artists out of the financial equation and defies their inaliable right to be attributed as the authors of their own work, things may be changing for the better. At the SALA Awards, a new prize was offered: the Adelaide City Council Encouragement Award. One of the richest prizes on offer, it presented one Adelaide artist with a $2000 commission to produce a new work specifically for the Lantern.

When a piece of public infrastructure like the Rundle Lantern is constructed and a business model created around it, why should the content creator get the raw deal? Why is it that the contractors should command a ‘load-up fee’ for each video posted and annual maintenance fees while the best artists can hope for is an uncredited display and a free load-up? If the power of this structure as a cultural canvas is to be realised, the Adelaide City Council should look at genuine, sustainable incentives to generate content, not convenient cost-saving measures which benefit the council, break Federal Australian law and stiff the artists in the process.

Dan Monceaux

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Art: Pushing pixels from ‘The Dudleys!’ to Dead Pixel Designs

by on Feb.09, 2010, under Great Finds, Our Projects

Our passion for retro lo-fi pixel art has really fired up these last 2 years. It all began with the discovery of the freeware progam IcoFX which allowed us to reconnected us with our c64-generation creative urges. I produced our first pixel art poster for a Supermarket show in Big Star Records’ basement in September 2008 and things have snowballed from there!

Happening around the same time was the erection of a giant public lo-res screen at the end of Adelaide’s busy Rundle Mall- The Rundle Lantern. Astonishing in both scale and low-resolution, it wraps around two sides of a multi-storey carpark at a highly trafficked intersection. Emma Sterling and I leapt at the opportunity to produce original animation for it. Our ‘how to’ guide to producing animation for it is available here at Creativity Base. Merge Magazine also caught wind of what I was up to, and commissioned artwork for a front cover and feature article spread.

Meanwhile, in North America, a man I met through a chiptune email-list was cooking up a grand design. Emerging theatre writer and director Steven Gridley put a call out for chiptune musicians and pixel artists and animators, to help create a world that slips between the ‘real’ and that of a glitchy 1980’s Nintendo game. I was originally eager to animate many projected sequences throughout the play, but in the end the team expanded and the workload was shared nicely. Below is a showreel featuring some of the animated sequences from the play, and a chiptune score also written by Steven Gridley. Mine is the flat-looking Mario-esque sidescroller. You can read more about the show at the blog Brooklynshiner.

Since then, I’ve had enough compliments on my pixel art to decide to open an online store, and make designs for merchandise and apparrel. Dead Pixel Designs launched late last year, and the inventory in the Zazzle shopfront is growing nicely. Recent friend and gun programmer Jay Straw also helped me integrate the store into my website, closing the associative gap between danimations and Dead Pixel Designs.

In March, Emma Sterling and I are running a pixel art and animation workshop as part of the DIY cultural event Format Festival right here in Adelaide. Keep an eye on their website, and come along if you love pixels as much as we do- finished works will be screening on the Rundle Lantern!

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Art: An artists’ guide to the Rundle Lantern

by on Feb.04, 2009, under Our Projects, Tips & Advice

The Rundle Lantern in action

The Rundle Lantern in action

Dazzling pedestrians with its light display and critics with it’s extraordinary cost, the Rundle Lantern is the latest contentious fixture in the heart of Adelaide’s CBD. Designed as a ‘cultural canvas’, and no doubt inspired by Melbourne’s Federation Square and similar light/sculpture/screen combinations overseas, the lantern is essentially an enormous display screen, designed to titillate spectators with its infinite colour combinations and conceal the unsightly multi-storey carpark that provides its scaffold.

While the screen itself can display video content, don’t get to thinking Time Square, New York, or downtown Tokyo. Despite its gargantuan scale, the screen is actually incredibly low resolution, and is made up of a grid of metal panels, each illuminated by white LEDs. Capable of tinting the metal panels across the full spectrum of hues, the LEDs can apply two pixels of colour (left and right sides) per panel. The grid is 34 illuminated panels wide, and twenty one high, with the screen extending along the building’s two most prominent sides. As the picture demonstrates, It wraps around the carpark’s corner, to create a unique and memorable facade. When the sun goes down each night, the fun begins.

Rundle Lantern pixels

Rundle Lantern 'pixels'

Designed and managed by contractor Fusion for the Adelaide City Council, Emma Sterling and I are lucky to be among the first wave of artists outside of Fusion’s studio to design content for the lantern. Despite a spectacular launch event back in October, complete with fireworks exploding off the carpark roof, to date the content has fallen well short of meeting the cultural objectives for the site, or displaying any significant artistic content.

Enter ‘Lantern La Lumiere’, a project commissioned by the Adelaide Fringe Festival,  supported by the South Australian Film Corporation and the Media Resource Centre. Armed with the basic technical requirements of preparing content for the lantern and some anecdotal advice from Fusion, eighteen Adelaide artists are currently producing up to one minute of content each, in preparation for the launch of Adelaide Fringe Festival on February 27th. The Lantern works will screen each night of the Fringe, with the loop synced to restart every hour on the hour until March 21.

Lantern La Lumiere workshop (Feb 1, 2009)

'Lantern La Lumiere' workshop (Feb 1)

Em and I first found out about the Rundle Lantern late last year, and attended a ‘secrets revealed’ session where we learned everything we needed to know about the screens capabilities… and some shocking figures related to the cost of its implementation and annual operations. Unfortunately, the workshop didn’t expand on this, so it seems like we’re as well equipped as anyone to share the knowledge. Here’s all the info you really need to get started designing and making content for the Rundle Lantern:


  • For cleanest results (ie, no colour bleeding) treat each panel as a single pixel. That means a canvas of 34 x 21 pixels in Photoshop or similar.
  • The software and hardware engine driving the lantern is called Hippotizer Media Server or ‘Hippo’ for short. Hippo sends the video as an MPEG2 file, at 680 x 420 pixels. Presently only Fusion staff are authorized to load content onto the system, after it has been approved by council.
  • Hippo can handle standard PAL video (720 x 576, 25 frames per second), but will resize it down to 680 x 420, so it’s better to output at this resolution yourself.
  • Colour separation in shadow and highlight areas is limited, so high-contrast designs will appear more accurately (and effectively) on the lantern than subtle low-contrast designs.
  • You can upload your files to the Rundle Lantern Simulator, and also look at previews of clips in progress and in the queue awaiting moderation/launching.
  • The simulator is really to guide you in the placement of the structure’s corner in the projected design- it does not represent the contrast shift which occurs at the site in reality.
  • To date, live video feeds have not been tested but have not been ruled out for the future.
  • There is currently no permanent means for outputting sound at the Lantern site.

Em and I are currently working on our pieces in preparation for the launch, and will post them, along with notes on our specific workflows. Using free and readily available software is absolutely encouraged. Use whatever tools you favour and have on hand… be it a consumer video camera and Windows Movie Maker or free icon editing software to draw with, like IcoFX. If you’re a child of Gen X and grew up with 8-bit computers like the C64 and Atari, join us and embrace this opportunity to celebrate a very public pixel renaissance!

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